Tag Archives: corazon aquino

In case you missed it

3 Aug

Here’s the full The Buzz interview with host Kris Aquino at the wake of President Cory Aquino.

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PDI turns yellow

2 Aug

The Philippine Daily Inquirer turns yellow for the day in  honor of President Cory Aquino.

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Pasok na pasok sa banga!

A fun interview with Cory

1 Aug

Ten months into the Cory presidency, Time magazine did an interview with the woman formerly known only as Ninoy’s wife.  This interview revealed so much about Cory that if you hadn’t read the article then, you’d still get a bit surprised reading this today at how much Cory had matured after her husband’s death.

CLICK HERE to read Time Magazine’s interview published on January 5, 1987.

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Being sold at Ebay.ph with the description: A large campaign photo of Corazon Aquino shaking the hands of rondalla musicians during the 1986 Snap Presidential Elections against strongman Ferdinand Marcos.

Meanwhile, Bulatlat made an honest-to-goodness tribute to the memory of the first woman president. Brutal, but still written with respect.  Excerpts:

However, owing to her background, she fell short of implementing substantial reforms. She signed the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Law, but the law had to be extended for more than two decades without being completed. The mill and farm workers of the Cojuangco-owned Hacienda Luisita had to fight for the land they have tilled for generations for two decades, paying for it with their blood before being able to gain it. She refused to renegotiate even the onerous foreign debts of the Marcos dictatorship, passing the Automatic Appropriation Law instead. And the Aquino government pursued the same economic policies that have wreaked havoc on the lives of the Filipino masses.

Cory as Time’s Woman of the Year

1 Aug

Whatever else happens in her rule, Aquino has already given her country a bright, and inviolate, memory. More important, she has also resuscitated its sense of identity and pride. In the Philippines those luxuries are especially precious. Almost alone among the countries of Asia, it has never been steadied by an ancient culture; its sense of itself, and its potential, was further worn away by nearly four centuries of Spanish and American colonialism. The absence of a spirit of national unity has also made democracy elusive. Even Jose Rizal, a political reformer shot by the Spanish and a national hero, called the Filipinos “a people without a soul.” Yet in February, for a few extraordinary moments, the people of the Philippines proved their bravery to the world, and to themselves.

– January 5, 1987, Time Magazine’s Woman of the Year story on President Corazon C. Aquino

They were all yellow

29 Jul

We hate to say it but the whole country is on deathwatch.

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Even I believe that miracles do happen.  But then again, as a nation, we should also start counting on ourselves to make real democracy happen.  True, Cory Aquino is a living reminder that tyranny can be overthrown by the will of the good.  But Cory is not the only icon of democracy.  Like Ninoy, hindi rin siya nag-iisa.

Every person, dead or alive, who fought against the oppressive governments today and those that went before us, who shed his or her blood to achieve the gains we have achieved today, who walked the streets in protest, who cried against greed and corruption is also a symbol of democracy.

Democracy seems to be dying along with Cory.  But it is not because of the former president’s deteriorating health.  It is because many of us have lost interest in getting our voices heard, in walking the streets in protest, in fighting against the oppressors, the corrupt, and the greedy.  We wait for leaders to emerge, yet believe that “‘pare-pareho lang naman ‘yan.”  We wait for the bishops to speak for us, but they remain in conflict with our need for reproductive health care.  We want to rid our country of corrupt officials, but we worm our way out of traffic violations or get business permits by feeding the greed of small fries.  We’re a country of contradictions, and each one of us a work in progress.

So as many hold vigils for Cory, let’s not forget to hold vigils for our own country.  Pray, not for serenity that lets us accept things we cannot change – we’ve had that far too long – but for courage, that we may change the things we badly need to change.

And pray for wisdom, to know the difference between Hacienda Luisita and the rest of the country’s agricultural land.